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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)
, they do have a lot to feel guilty for. it was liberal democrats that were the ones fighting civil rights for 100 years after the civil war in addition to fighting the civil war. and they just write these revisionist histories and then play act themselves being civil rights champions. um, i mean, the quote from bill clinton. on his first inaugural as governor, he was embracing orville -- [inaudible] who stood in the schoolhouse during little rock. democrat bill clinton invites democrat segregationist jay william full bright to the white house to give him the medal of freedom in which he cites fulbright, you know, he teaches us that the russians are people too. but fulbright didn't ever see that black americans were people, too, since he signed the southern manifesto, voted against the '64 civil rights act. cheryl: you really in the book go after politicians, and you say they have used the black community to their own benefit. >> oh, yes. cheryl: give me some specific examples. >> well, that's the funny thing. while being pompous and engaging in this moral training as if they are the champ
, georgia. he's urging faith leaders and even civil rights leaders in the african-american community to mobilize their churches to help kids, parents, and teachers find solutions to the problems in education. he says, kids must come first. >> we just have a crisis in our country. in our public education system is not doing well by our children, it's going to take an entire community to say enough is enough. >> johnson wants to level the playing field for all children who operate from a disadvantage, something he's too familiar with. >> and i grow up in a poor neighborhood and the only way to make it out of the community is basketball and got a scholarship to uc berkley. >> and he knows competing and winning, as a nba player with the phoenix suns enjoyed 12 years as one of the top players of the game. during his nba career, jonathan launched st. hope, a nonprofit community development organization to revitalize earn city communities in his hometown of sacramento. >> i didn't have any of my friends with me on college. they were on drugs, you know, in jail or dead. and i remember thinki
an economic problem all but it is deeper structure is that it is a civil rights problem. it is wrong. probably constitutionally, to greet a deficit structure which results in a tax necessity which reached out and grab the labor of future children without representation. that is a form of fiscal slavery to read you have reached out and grab their labor to spend it now. who are the but to the advantage? obviously everyone who are -- who benefits from government services and does not so to speak paid their fair share. it might be said there states the receive more than their fair share of government benefits. so there is a benefit by geography. there is one by sector of the economy. he might be -- you might be -- age and income are frequently referred to. they represent degette. that is why it is so difficult for us to close it -- they represent the gap. that is why it is difficult for us to close is carried if i were also a candidate, i want to talk about the solution to the civil problem be to invest in kids. it is difficult to solve this problem without an economy that is doing better. one of
people don't need a lot of living space. >> and activists believe civil rights could be compromised to make way for the housing. >> and did you lose your home in the great recession? still to come how you might qualify for part of a nationwide settlement for homeowner autos looking closely. do you recognize this reporter? coming up a well deserved salute to one of our abc 7 news colleagues. stay with us. >>> president ob krauma told the united nations he's disgusted by the antiislamic movie made by a california man but added bhaiming the united states is also wrong. the movie have become an issue in the race for the white house and abc 7 news is here with the latest on this controversy. >> the president spoke at the un general assembly today. and there is both talking foreign policy. >> at the united nations president obama used the world stage to decry recent u.s. attacks. >> they were attacks on america and should be no doubt we'll be relentless in tracking down killers and bringing them to justice. >> mitt romney hammer the president as what he characterized as the president's re
. we won the olympics, in part, because we've had civil rights laws and the laws that prohibit discrimination against women. i have been for those efforts all my life. the president's record is quite different. the question is our future. president kennedy once said in response to similar arguments, "we are great, but we can be greater.'' we can be better if we face our future, rejoice in our strengths, face our problems, and by solving them, build a better society for our children. thank you. >> thank you, mr. mondale. [applause] please, we have not finished quite yet. thank you, mr. mondale, and thank you, mr. president. and our thanks to our panel members, as well. and so we bring to a close this first of the league of women voters presidential debates of 1984. you two can go at each again in the final league debate on october 21st, in kansas city, missouri. and this thursday night, october 11th, at 9 p.m. eastern daylight time, the vice president, george bush, will debate congresswoman geraldine ferraro in philadelphia. and i hope that you will all watch once again. no matt
button topics including same-sex marriage, and a challenge to a key civil rights law, the voting rights act, requiring states with a history of discrimination to get approval from the feds before making any changes to election and voting rules. shannon covers the court for us and is live in washington. shannon, what is left to be settled here? >>guest: well, when it comes to the health care law you will remember back if june the court uphell the individual mandate and rules on other issues involving the expansion of medicaid but there are many other portions of the law the high court did not rule on including the employer mandate. that is one of the elements that the liberty university has been challenging from the going. today the court indicated it is willing to take the issue seriously by giving the administration 30 days to respond to a request by liberty university for a rehearing on that issue. >>shepard: that is one thing. what are the odds it will make it before the court? >>guest: many court watchers who believe the university has a good shot at a second chance. >> they have go
know, he gets a lot of grief on civil rights. and it's true he did not use the bully pulpit. he could have done a better job on that. but he was a subtle guy. he desegregated d.c. when people weren't watching. he desegrated the armed wt tr. appointed all the federal judges that desegregated the south. he believed in moving, as john was saying, with a hidden hand. that's true on civil rights as well. he's been unfairly criticized for being weak on civil rights. he was not as strong as he could havebeen, but he did ts poant. w >> let's talk, presidential historian, jon meacham, who has a book coming out after the election that's forthcoming. "thomas jefferson, t.j." ike, a good president? a ar great president? or a great president? think that he -- one of the things we haven't talked about on the domestic side is he ratified what franklin roosevelt and harry truman had done in that he could have created --n 1952, 3,it cle,think, and check me on this, evan, was such that if he had been really intent on rolling back the new deal and the fair deal, it would ve been a huge fight and would h
enacted by the first congress. but it sat dormant for 170 odd years. then some civil rights type folks picked it up and human rights type folks and started bringing cases in which the plaintiff is foreign, the defendant is foreign, and the tort took place in some foreign place and they are bringing it to u.s. courts. so a paraguayan plaintiff and a pair of wayne defendant and it took place in her way. so the ticket to a u.s. -- a paraguayan plaintiff and a paraguayan defendant and it took place in paraguay. so they take it to the u.s. in this particular case, k iobal takes place in nigeria. and the nigerian government mistreated me, torture and so forth and these will companies, foreign oil companies, were complice it, helping the nigerian government do this to me. so i am wanting to sue the oil companies in federal court. and the oil companies defendants say that this does not apply to corporations. you cannot sue a corporation under this statute. that was their claim last year at the supreme court and the u.s. supreme court heard arguments in the case and did something very unusual.
's" top five. in 1962, 29-year-old veteran named james meredith took a giant step for civil rights when he became the first black student at the university of mississippi. at the time segregation was still the norm across much of the south. mississippi's governor and lt. governor had lock mr.ed james meredith from enrollment not once but three times. then a federal court stepped in and gave the okay. thousands of white stiewntsdz and others responded with large scale riots. tear glass filled the air at least two people died. u.s. marshals surrounded the student as he walked across campus to his first day of class now, the machine different story. minorities make up 24% of the student body and there is a statue to the man who changed ole miss forever 50 years ago today and no you know the news for this monday, october the 1st, 2012 i'm shepard smith. we're back tom
these cases can be so big they can be exported. civil-rights concerned about cutting back on class-action. too expensive to litigate each case one by one. the justices in the comcast case will consider the question of how much judges should decide about the case before certifying and saying everyone can be in all the lawsuits together. do they have to figure route if all these people and have one theory of damages or have to look at whether there was a fraud or securities fraud case so there will be more in line of the wal-mart decision about class-action procedure? two tiny actions. people in college try to get text books that are not incredibly expensive. the supreme court has a copyright case about what happens with market goods. text books made overseas when sold at a lower price are imported to the united states. producer of that book or any other copyrighted material have a right to limit it coming into the united states and actually a body on the questions of when a lawsuit is moved. a very lawyer the the the the issue but those who are interested and are practicing lawyers there are fi
. >> it is the most important election in the modern history of this country. we've got civil rights on the line. we've got human rights on the ne. >> reporter: 31 states currently have laws in place th will require voters to show i.d. at the polls in novbe voting rights activeists say ste laws are disproportionately targeting minorities saying these laws have proven to be costly, ineffective and unnecessary. >> proponents say they prevent fraud at the voting booth. but activists know these laws are also likely to lead to reduced voter turnout. in addition a recent study found nearly half of the nation's states have new voting measure that could stop some latinos from heading to the polls in november. some states are using inaccurate or ated citizenship lists. inome cases rerecently natulized cits purged from those lists. >> what we do object to is very narrow requirements that place burdens on poor people, on the elderly, on people of color or ethnic groups that make it harderfo the to vote. >> reporter: for john hazelwood, his decision to register vote is driven by a simple motivation. >> i'm in
. megyn: just ahead, america's most prominent civil right group is asking the united nations to investigate what it calls racist voting laws in the united states. the controversial case in today's "kelly's court." one senator is calling it benghazi gait. the growing questions about the killings of four americans in libya and how the white house characterized it from the days since. we'll have reaction from the former white house chief of stop andy card. >> al qaeda sacks an embassy and kills an ambassador. the administration didn't want to admit it. the administration thinking if it stringt out long enough the media would let it slide. [ male announcer ] sponges take your mark. [ female announcer ] one drop of ultra daw has twice the everyday grease cleaning ingredients eading non-concentrated brand... to clean 2x more greasy dishes. dawn does more. so it's not a chore. megyn: 2:31 in the east. back to our top story. several deputy kralts on the senate foreign relations committee have joined republicans sending a lower the state department asking what kind of intelligence we
and having been in charlotte, a great civil-rights city, where the students from the historical black college in 1960 set up a lunch counter in to grant them and yet, what do we see today? state after state, efforts to suppress voting rights instead of expanding them. not enough people vote in this country. in pennsylvania, there is legislation now on the books that could disenfranchise between 750,000-1 million people. president obama won by 600,000 boats in pennsylvania last time. this really does determine the election. i don't care who you are for. this will determine the election. it is a huge problem or the country. we should be celebrating voters going to the polls, not putting impediments in their way. host: the radio program " democracy now" turns 25 this year? guest: we started in 1996. we were just on radio. the week of september 11, 2001, we started on the first television station in new york city on public access. then it just caught on like wildfire. beyond the election and more television stations aired us and radio stations and npr stations and pbs stations all over the countr
impact especially on civil rights cases. and i think it's entirely poible the court may limit or even overrule justice o'connor's opinion getting rid of racial preferences more and more. >> so this is a case involving a state university, aic university. so if they decide that affirmative action giving a preference to certain students based on race for example is unconstitutional, would it also automatically apply to private universities that get federal aid, for example? >> not automatically. but this is the way the court works is that they decide one case at a time. and they establish principles that are later applied or not applied. each case can be somewhat diffent. but if t say that a university which is a part of the state may not consider race, that race is simply impermissib impermissible, you can be sure that that message will filter out not just through universities but also to employers and to the government. it could be an enormous change. we'll only deal with public universities this term. >> let me read to you from your column you wrote on cnn.com. very provocative but im
marriage equality, i think it is constitutionally guaranteed with the civil-rights of the '60s. >> host: john is the independent. >> caller: mr. johnson mr. johnson, the only problem i have is about the tax issue. our taxes have never been set up to be fair. originally for the rich to pay them majority of taxes in federal taxes and a working class or poor would pay the majority of there's of homeowners gomez city, and state taxes. my problem with a fair tax is we're on a fixed income. the states will have to have such a high tax rate because the federal government has such a low were one. if someone buys a refrigerator at $700 there will be the $100 tax. that is the problem. the only when it will hurt are the people that are retired, disability, and the things like that. otherwise i am in completely in line with you. i voted for ron paul. i voted for paul brown. i cannot remember what year he ran. i voted for ross perot once. i am very open-minded better watch things closely. >> host: thank you for calling. gary johnson and the reaction? >> guest: by going to a national consumption tax
weekly standard" would agree. when we look at civil rights, it should be not about the quality of results. it might reflect that there is a republican primary going on, or it might reflect the fact that they are failing the same journalistic standards. i think this varies over time. that is just a false logic. i do not know that it is 3 to 1, and i do not know the time you're talking about. some of that is republicans criticizing other republicans. it is certainly not three to one on our side. other questions? we have two here, if we can get the microphone over to the table in front of the cameras. i am keeping her hopping here. >> i am michael, and given what we have just heard about people choosing to believe their side or their candidate or their team of people that believe they are objective journalists, and i count myself among them, and i do not believe that many voters believe that being a liar is a disqualifying traits. what are you guys seeing? what can happen on the ground because of fact checking? >> kathleen alluded to this earlier. there is some modification in behavior. i ha
to end the civil rights investigation. the board says african-american students receive an unfair majority of suspensions. the board has a plan in place to make sure students are treated equally. >>> a mother ran away leaving her daughter behind at the safeway to deal with police. the girl is staying with her grandmother. >>> nobel peace laureate ang sang su kyi will visit the area. she will speak at a sold out event tomorrow. we will have a look at the forecast and the morning commute when we come back. >>> welcome back. taking a live look at san francisco. i want to step out of the way so you see how foggy it is. that is the natural coolant off the pacific. we will soar into the weekend. a dangerous heat wave. if you work outdoors and you are caught off guard, you want to stay hydrated. it is not too bad right now. 61 in livermore. sunny finish for today. warmer than acknowledge conditions. heat wave sunday through tuesday. toward the end of next week, cooler weather arrives. we have to get through this, saturday through tuesday, triple digit heat. stay cool out there. let's che
the right in a situation of civil war? >> is not just accepting the right, it is the position of the international world. it is not achievable in every country right now. there are lots of countries where you don't have those kinds of rights were we have solid relations with china. and so is an aspiration and it is an aspiration that increasingly, over time, has become a reality in some many parts of the world. and so we keep pushing that aspiration ford and keep hoping that country after country, one group of people after another will learn to live in peace and build a representative form of government. when you say democracy, you think american jeffersonian model. there are lots of models. but is the aspiration that everyone has the right to self- determination. i hope it will happen in syria as well. we don't know how to make it happen, but remember that we live with all the countries in the arab spring for years without those rights being there. we found it necessary to accommodate ourselves to the fact that these were autocratic leaders and it was their people that finall
support. >> all right. thanks for filling us in. as you know, there's a terrible civil war going on right now in syria. many people, many leaders, including our own, calling for the ouster of president assad who allegedly has been killing his own people in an effort to keep his seat. we'll have much more on the protests outside the united nations in the hours to come on cnn. of course, we'll be covering mahmoud ahmadinejad's speech which will come your way in a half hour. >>> let's talk football, huh. banning the replacement refs, the new jersey senate is pushing a bill to do that. you'll hear from him next. >> announcer: with nothing but his computer, an identity thief is able to use your information to open a bank account in order to make your money his money. [whoosh, clang] you need lifelock, the only identity theft protection company that now monitors bank accounts for takeover fraud. lifelock: relentlessly protecting your identity. call 1-800-lifelock or go to lifelock.com today. [ female announcer ] imagine skin so healthy, it never gets dry again. can your moisturizer do that? [ f
fighters. according to the syrian on or about tore for human rights. the death toll from the civil war has now reached 30,000. the activist group reports nearly two thirds of those deaths came during the past six months and the death toll includes more than 7300 government soldiers. it's not every day you see somebody walking down the street holding what looks like a rocket launcher, is it? apparently this dressed up character was just pretending to be a terrorist and the whole thing was supposed to be some sort of test for the cops. it did not go as planned. plus, with childhood obesity on the rise, congress voted to cut calories in school lunches. students are complaining. coming up. how some of them have found a creative way to get their point across. ♪ tonight ♪ we are hungry ♪ set the policy on fire ♪ it can burn brighter ♪ than the sun ♪ >> shepard: well it turns out staging a terrorist hoax can land you in trouble. recorded a video in which his teenage nephew posed as a terrorist dressed up in weird garb holding what looked like a rocket propelled grenade. the kid in the
a new constitution. with that constitution, we further secured the human rights and civil liberties of our citizens and entrenched constitutional governance and justice. over each of the past 0 years we have scored significant victries over diseases including h.i.v. and aids. malaria. tuberculosis and other childhood and adult diseases. hundreds of thousands of more children have found their way into school and in life, life skills through training and capacity building. we have also taken many kenyans and put them on the pathaway of economic independence and self-reliance. in doing this, we have also expanded our economic base. opening up new andive infrastructure, energy, and information technology projects. the achievements in our country have been attained through the respect for the rule of law. through sound policies, improved governance, as well as open and innovative democracy. however, as all kenyans recognize, we will have a lot more work to do. poverty, disease, unemployment still remain a big challenge for us. nevertheless, i am confident that we will see the opportunity
respect the right in a situation of civil war? >> is not just accepting the right, it is the position of the international world. it is not achievable in every country right now. there are lots of countries where you don't have those kinds of rights were we have solid relations with china. and so is an aspiration and it is an aspiration that increasingly, over time, has become a reality in some many parts of the world. and so we keep pushing that aspiration ford and keep hoping that country after country, one group of people after another will learn to live in peace and build a representative form of government. when you say democracy, you think american jeffersonian model. there are lots of models. but is the aspiration that everyone has the right to self- determination. i hope it will happen in syria as well. we don't know how to make it happen, but remember that we live with all the countries in the arab spring for years without those rights being there. we found it necessary to accommodate ourselves to the fact that these were autocratic leaders and it was their people that finall
. america and israel hold a certain values, pluralism, tolerance, religious pluralism, equal rights for women, all of these things. we are in a cultural war, a clash of civilizations. the media continue to buy into this myth that they bought into during world war ii and in the months and years preceding it, that dictators can be appeased by simply giving something that they lack. and you see that in the editorials and the columns in most of the new york times and l.a. times, wrong. >> rick: and the photos of prime minister netanyahu posing as the worst dictator in the history of dictatorships, what were they doing, other than show political bias? >> it was an accident. what's reallily particularly atrocious about this, i'm know the a huge netanyahu fan, abouter say, but the fact that they have so much animus towards him that they don't have to ahmadnejad. if you compared the two, i don't think they should be allowed to send the picture out like that. you don't see them expressing anger or disgust to somebody who discusses wiping off a nation off the map. >> rick: no confusing the
of civil society between the two countries, but on the basis which would not be tantamount to lecturing and indicating to domestic things as something which gives the united states the right to, you know, to pass being accused of something which they never did, only for intentions. and intentions having been promoted by the f.b.i. agents. like it was the case in liberian who told -- missed the boot who was extradited from thailand in spite of the fact that the thai court ruled against extradition. >> rose: yes, he was an arms dealer. >> extra dated. >> rose: we're referring to the man who was accused of being an arms dealer. >> yes, that's exactly the gentleman. and she was approached by undercover agents and she was provoked into giving his agreement, his intention to provide some transportation services. and they both got huge sentences while the people with the russian kids in the families adopted them basically get out without any real punishment. but having said this, i do believe that there are always problems between any two countries, especially such big countries as the unite
is not going unnoticed. we're there as his co-workers celebrate a huge milestone. we'll be right back. >>> he's called a hero, an icon, a role model for federal employees. today navy workers sarcas cattagin celebrated a career truly a lifetime, 70 years of military and civil service. 89-year-old sarcas cattigan is waiting for the bus, yes, 89. every day he takes public transportation to the navy yard. what's the best part of your job? >> when you're fully occupied. >> reporter: he's been occupied with the military since 1942 as a junior radio aircraft inspector in philadelphia. now in washington he oversees billions of dollars as the associate director of small business. >> well, i guess there isn't much left to say. i've said it all. >> reporter: to honor his seven decades of service, the navy yard took a moment to officially recognize his commitment and work ethic. >> this is what dad has been working towards. he's just one year leads into the next before. you know it, it's 70 years. >> reporter: mr. t as he's better known in the building doesn't plan on retiring any time soon. his colle
of principles that we agree with with pakistan on afghanistan. i think neither of us want to see the civil war. we should find that basis. the question people are struggling with right now with the right mechanism in the bilateral relationship, but the right mechanism to pull people together to find those things we have in common. anyone in the last month or six weeks there've been developments i'm not privy to but i sense i'm moving ahead. per your question is a good one. we don't have, to my knowledge, we have not achieved the kind of meeting of minds on afghanistan that were going to need for this process up to 2014 and beyond 2014 to address. so it is an open question i agree if there is a tough one, that is the. i'm an independent consultant and i have a couple of questions that pick up on other points that i believe you made. if i understood you correctly, you really suggesting that we start our relations when people share our values. i'm sympathetic to that idea. i wanted first to make a comment, which many of those people in some sense identified with our values or goals are at least s
. >> paul steinhauser, good to see you. thanks so much from washington. >> thank you. >>> all right, as world leaders gather in new york, trying to figure out how to end syria's civil war, the numbers coming out of the country show the crisis is getting far worse. youtube video showing just how risky walking in syria's biggest sy of aleppo it be. 122 people have been killed so far today. the death toll since march, 2011, 30,000. that figure from a syrian human rights group. and now the united nations is releasing this figure. 700,000. that's the number of refugees predicted to flow into other countries. the u.n.'s refugee agency is asking for more than $480 million in aid. as ts is happing, u.s. defense secretary leon panetta said today that u.s. intelligence has detected syria moving chemical weapons at some sites for security reasons. a detail that could influence a decision about u.s. military intervention in syria. remember, this is what president obama said about chemical weapons in syria just last month. >> a red line for us is we start saying a whole bunch of chemical weapons
these people, train journalists, train politicians, and train them how to provide services. right now a lot of these areas aren't getting electricity. they aren't getting sanitation. how do you help the civil service help deliver services to the country so everything's not falling apart, and then waiting for that day after that we've been talking about? but as you see, it's continuing to spiral, many deaths, and while they're planning for the day after, people are dying right now. >> when is the day after? when is the day after? all right elise labott, thank you so much for that. we appreciate it. john, back to you. >> all right, 14 minutes after the hour right now. lots of news this morning. let's get the headlines from christine romans. >> with two days to go before the first of three critical debates, president obama is hunkering down in nevada, getting prepped with massachusetts senator john kerry. he's scheduled to fly in to play the part of mitt romney in practice sessions. the president trying to lower expectations at a rally in las vegas yesterday. >> mitt romney, he's a debater. i'
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)